LabBook May 2, 2014

Natasha Rodwell, radiology nurse, reads a pamphlet at the Sexual Assault Awareness Month booth at the Goldblatt Pavilion staffed by Anacany Barrera and Cassie Desir, coordinators of advocacy services for the YWCA Metropolitan Chicago, a center for services for survivors of sexual assault and abuse.

Natasha Rodwell, radiology nurse, reads a pamphlet at the Sexual Assault Awareness Month booth at the Goldblatt Pavilion staffed by Anacany Barrera and Cassie Desir, coordinators of advocacy services for the YWCA Metropolitan Chicago, a center for services for survivors of sexual assault and abuse.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Estimating Child Sleep From Parent Report of Time in Bed: Development and Evaluation of Adjustment Approaches: David Gozal — Journal of Pediatric Psychology, April 28, 2014

From the abstract: “A community sample of 217 children aged 4–9 years (mean age = 6.6 years) wore actigraph wristwatches to objectively measure sleep for 7 days while parents completed reports of child sleep each night … Parent report of child sleep overestimated nightly sleep duration by ∼24 min per night relative to actigraphy. Child age, gender, and sleep quality all had small or nonsignificant associations with correspondence between parent report and actigraph. Empirically derived adjustment factors significantly reduced the discrepancy between parent report and objective measurement.”

The Need to Promote All Pediatric Stem Cell Donors’ Understanding and Interests: Lainie Ross — Pediatrics, April 28, 2014

Commentary on study by Pentz, et al: “Contrary to their interpretation,1 Pentz and colleagues’ results support the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP’s) recommendation that a donor advocate (or similar mechanism) be appointed for all minors who are being considered as hematopoietic stem cell donors.2 The primary role of the donor advocate is to help potential donors and their parents understand the donation process and to promote potential donors’ interests and well-being. The article describes a number of situations in which understanding could have been improved. Delaying or preventing donation is a secondary aspect of the advocate’s role, and the need to exercise this authority would not have been expected in such a small sample.”

How T cells taste gluten in celiac disease: Bana Jabri — Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, April 28, 2014

From the abstract: “Genome-wide association studies have identified genes encoding major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules as the single most important predisposing factor for autoimmunity. A new study provides atomic insight into how the antigen receptors of intestinal T cells recognize dietary gluten that drives celiac disease pathogenesis when bound to the MHC class II molecule HLA-DQ2.5, the major genetic risk factor of celiac disease.”

Initial Dose of Antidepressant and Suicidal Behavior in Youth: Start Low, Go Slow: Robert Gibbons — JAMA Internal Medicine, April 28, 2014

Commentary on study by Miller, et al: “In this methodologically exemplar pharmacoepidemiological study by Miller et al,1 data on patients with depression were assessed for prospective risk for deliberate self-harm (DSH; ie, suicide attempt) according to whether the patients had been initiated on therapy with the modal dose vs higher than modal dose of antidepressant. Using propensity-matched analysis, initiation at a higher than modal dose of antidepressant resulted in a 2-fold increased risk of deliberate self-harm in patients aged 10 to 24 years, especially in the first 3 months of treatment, while there was no such effect found in those aged 25 to 64 years.”

Eating patterns in youth with restricting and binge eating/purging type anorexia nervosa: Daniel Le Grange, et al — International Journal of Eating Disorders, April 28, 2014

From the abstract: “Youth with [anorexia nervosa] generally follow a regular meal schedule, but are likely consuming insufficient amounts of food across meals and snacks. In contrast, youth with [anorexia nervosa with binge/purge behaviors] tend to have more irregular eating patterns, which may play a role in binge eating and purging behaviors.”

About Matt Wood (479 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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