LabBook May 9, 2014

This week we've been celebrating National Nurses Week, to honor our most important front-line care providers. On Wednesday, May 7, Courtney Sullivan received the Huening Award for excellence in Medical Intensive Care nursing. The award was established  in memory of former patient Mark Huening.

This week we’ve been celebrating National Nurses Week, to honor our most important front-line care providers. On Wednesday, May 7, Courtney Sullivan received the Huening Award for excellence in Medical Intensive Care nursing. The award was established  in memory of former patient Mark Huening.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Effects of oxycodone on brain responses to emotional images: Margaret Wardle, Harriet de Wit — Psychopharmacology, May 5, 2014

From the abstract: “Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that opiate drugs decrease emotional responses to negative stimuli and increase responses to positive stimuli. Such emotional effects may motivate misuse of oxycodone (OXY), a widely abused opiate … We examined effects of OXY on brain activity during presentation of positive and negative visual emotional stimuli … Contrary to our expectations, OXY did not affect behavioral or neural responses to emotional stimuli in our primary areas of interest.”

Pregnancy-induced changes in ultradian rhythms persist in circadian arrhythmic Siberian hamsters: Z Yan Wang, Erin Cable, Brian Prendergast — Hormones and Behavior, May 2, 2014

From the abstract: “The impact of pregnancy and lactation on ultradian rhythms (URs) and circadian rhythms (CRs) of locomotor activity was assessed in circadian rhythmic and arrhythmic Siberian hamsters maintained in a long-day photoperiod (16 h light/day) … Relaxation of circadian control of the dam’s behavior may increase fitness by permitting more efficient interactions with circadian-arrhythmic pups.”

See more of Science Life’s coverage of Brian Prendergast’s work with Siberian hamsters and ultradian rhythms.

The role of commensal bacteria in the regulation of sensitization to food allergens: Severine Cao, Taylor J. Feehley, Cathryn R. Nagler — FEBS Letters, May 1, 2014

From the abstract: “The prevalence of life-threatening anaphylactic responses to food is rising at an alarming rate. The emerging role of the gut microbiota in regulating food allergen sensitization may help explain this trend. The mechanisms by which commensal bacteria influence sensitization to dietary antigens are only beginning to be explored … Our research presents exciting new possibilities for preventing and treating food allergies based on interventions that modulate the composition of the gut microbiota.”

Ethical Considerations for Clinical Trials in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: David Rubin, Mark Siegler, Samuel Beckr — Gastroenterology & Hepatology, January 2014

From the abstract: “Although advancements in the field of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include effective therapies for many patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, there remains a large unmet need, and there is a large number of investigational agents in the pipeline. Drug development through clinical trials is critical to understanding the safety and efficacy of new therapies in the affected human population, and the need for ethical trial design is of the utmost importance. This paper explores the ethical issues of clinical trials in IBD, focusing on placebo-controlled trials, vulnerable patients, exposure to monoclonal antibodies, globalization of trials, and surgical advances.”

About Matt Wood (468 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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