LabBook May 16, 2014

NASCAR driver Ryan Reed (center, if you can't tell him apart from the other kids) plays video games with Sam, 12, and Christian, 14, patients at Comer Children's Hospital. Reed, who has type 1 diabetes, visited Comer this week while filming an episode for Walgreen's Race Across America web series.

NASCAR driver Ryan Reed (center, if you can’t tell him apart from the other kids–he’s only 20) plays video games with Sam, 12, and Christian, 14, patients at Comer Children’s Hospital. Reed, who has type 1 diabetes, visited Comer this week while filming an episode for Walgreen’s Race Across America web series.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Genome-wide interaction studies reveal sex-specific asthma risk alleles: Carole Ober, Rachel Myers, Nicole Scott, Dan Nicolae — Human Molecular Genetics

From the abstract: “Asthma is a complex disease with sex-specific differences in prevalence. Candidate gene studies have suggested that genotype-by-sex interaction effects on asthma risk exist, but this has not yet been explored at a genome-wide level. We aimed to identify sex-specific asthma risk alleles by performing a genome-wide scan for genotype-by-sex interactions in the ethnically diverse participants in the EVE Asthma Genetics Consortium.”

Regular exercise is associated with emotional resilience to acute stress in healthy adults: Harriet de Wit, Emma Childs — Frontiers in Physiology

From the abstract: “Physical activity has long been considered beneficial to health and regular exercise is purported to relieve stress. However empirical evidence demonstrating these effects is limited. In this study, we compared psychophysiological responses to an acute psychosocial stressor between individuals who did, or did not, report regular physical exercise.”

Using Electronic Health Record Data to Develop and Validate a Prediction Model for Adverse Outcomes in the Wards: Dana Edelson, Robert Gibbons, Trevor Yuen, Matthew Churpek — Critical Care Medicine

From the abstract: “Over 200,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States each year and many of these events may be preventable. Current vital sign–based risk scores for ward patients have demonstrated limited accuracy, which leads to missed opportunities to identify those patients most likely to suffer cardiac arrest and inefficient resource utilization. We derived and validated a prediction model for cardiac arrest while treating ICU transfer as a competing risk using electronic health record data.”

About Matt Wood (507 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer at the University of Chicago Medicine and nonfiction editor for Another Chicago Magazine.
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