LabBook May 30, 2014

A look down at the 2014 Quality Fair of the University of Chicago Medicine.  The event featured poster presentations of projects that use research-quality methods to design, implement, and evaluate innovative solutions to operational problems, or identify areas throughout the spectrum of treatment that need improvement. (Photo: Megan Doherty)

A look down at the 2014 Quality Fair of the University of Chicago Medicine. The event featured poster presentations of projects that use research-quality methods to design, implement, and evaluate innovative solutions to operational problems, or identify areas throughout the spectrum of treatment that need improvement. (Photo: Megan Doherty)

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

The oldest ionoscopiform from China sheds new light on the early evolution of halecomorph fishes: Michael Coates — Biology Letters

From the introduction: “The Amiiformes and closely related fossil lineages, including Ionoscopiformes and Parasemionotiformes, comprise the clade Halecomorphi. Today, halecomorphs are represented solely by the freshwater bowfin (Amia calva) from central and eastern North America. Previously, there was a conspicuous stratigraphic gap between definitive fossils attributable to the Parasemionotiformes in the Early Triassic … and those attributable to the ‘Ionoscopiformes–Amiiformes’ clade in the Jurassic. Ionoscopiforms have been known only from the Late Jurassic of Europe and the Early Cretaceous of the New World, although potential ionoscopiforms, questionably assigned in the genus Ophiopsis, have been reported from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian) of Italy and Austria. These, however, are based on poorly preserved specimens. Here, we report the discovery of a new ionoscopiform from the Middle Triassic Luoping Biota, Yunnan, China.”

The effects of extended bedtimes on sleep duration and food desire in overweight young adults. A home-based intervention: Esra Tasali, Florian Chapotota, Kristen Wroblewski — Appetite

From the abstract: “Sleep curtailment is an endemic behavior in modern society. Well-controlled laboratory studies have shown that sleep loss in young adults is associated with increased desire for high-calorie food and obesity risk. However, the relevance of these laboratory findings to real life is uncertain. We conducted a 3 week, within-participant, intervention study to assess the effects of extended bedtimes on sleep duration and food desire under real life conditions in individuals who are at risk for obesity … Sleep duration can be successfully increased in real life settings and obtaining adequate sleep is associated with less desire for high calorie foods in overweight young adults who habitually curtail their sleep.”

Occupation and thyroid cancer: Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy — Occupational & Environmental Medicine

From the abstract: “Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer.”

About Matt Wood (478 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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