LabBook July 11, 2014

HealtheRX, an electronic prescription connecting patients with wellness resources in their community, is rolled out to the adult and pediatric clinics at the University of Chicago Medicine on Tuesday, June 24, 2014.  Clinic coordinator Dorothy Shelton shows off a mock-up of a HealtheRX in the OBG/YN outpatient clinic in the DCAM. (Photo by Megan E. Doherty)

HealtheRX, an electronic prescription connecting patients with wellness resources in their community, is rolled out to the adult and pediatric clinics at the University of Chicago Medicine on Tuesday, June 24, 2014. Clinic coordinator Dorothy Shelton shows off a mock-up of a HealtheRX in the OBG/YN outpatient clinic in the DCAM. (Photo by Megan E. Doherty)

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

The Potential for Medical Therapy to Reduce the Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Optimize Surveillance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Including Christopher Chapman and David Rubin — Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America

From the abstract: “It has been proposed that effective disease control through abrogation of inflammation in IBD may also reduce CRC risk in these individual patients. This article summarizes the potential for medical therapy to reduce the risk of CRC via primary and secondary prevention, and offers practical ways in which a goal of mucosal improvement or healing may be incorporated into clinical practice.”

Effect of Depression on Diagnosis, Treatment, and Mortality of Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Including Scott Eggener — Journal of Clinical Oncology

From the abstract: “Although demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic differences may affect treatment and outcomes of prostate cancer, the effect of mental health disorders remains unclear. We assessed the effect of previously diagnosed depression on outcomes of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer … Men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer and a recent diagnosis of depression are less likely to undergo definitive treatment and experience worse overall survival.”

A Digital Network Approach to Infer Sex Behavior in Emerging HIV Epidemics: John Schneider — PLOS One

From the abstract: “Network data was generated from digitally extracted cell-phone contact lists of a purposeful sample of 241 high-risk men in India. These data were integrated with interview responses to describe the corresponding individuals in the contact lists and the ties between them. HIV serostatus was collected for each respondent and served as an internal validation of the model’s predictions of sex behavior … Combining the relative completeness and objectivity of digital network data with the substantive details of classical interview and HIV biomarker data permitted new analyses and insights into the accuracy of self-reported sex behavior.”

Sweet taste liking is associated with impulsive behaviors in humans: Jessica Weafer and Harriet de Wit — Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience

From the abstract: “Evidence from both human and animal studies suggests that sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is positively associated with impulsive behaviors, including both impulsive decision making and inhibitory control. The current study examined associations between the hedonic value of a sweet taste and two forms of impulsivity (impulsive choice and impulsive action) in healthy young adults … These findings indicate that impulsive choice may be associated with heightened sensitivity to the hedonic value of a rewarding stimulus, and that these constructs might share common underlying neurobiological mechanisms.”

About Matt Wood (479 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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