LabBook August 15, 2014

UChicago Medicine employees kicked off the Cubicle to 5K program with the Chicago Area Runners Association on Aug. 14, 2014. It's an 8-week training program to help runners get ready for the Comer Children's Hospital RBC Race for the Kids on Oct. 5. (Photo: @CARARuns)

UChicago Medicine employees kicked off the Cubicle to 5K program with the Chicago Area Runners Association on Aug. 14, 2014. It’s an 8-week training program to help runners get ready for the Comer Children’s Hospital RBC Race for the Kids on Oct. 5. (Photo: @CARARuns)

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Rhythms in Energy Storage Control the Ability of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock to Reset: Gopal Pattanayak, Connie Phong, Michael Rust — Current Biology

From the abstract: “Circadian clocks are oscillatory systems that schedule daily rhythms of organismal behavior. The ability of the clock to reset its phase in response to external signals is critical for proper synchronization with the environment. In the model clock from cyanobacteria … Our results show that clock-input phenotypes can arise from metabolic dysregulation and illustrate a framework for circadian biology where clock outputs feed back through metabolism to control input mechanisms.”

Statin Therapy Is Associated with Improved Survival in Patients with Non-Serous-Papillary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis: including Mohammed Habis, Kristen Wroblewski, Nadia Ismail, S. Diane Yamada, Lacey Litchfield, Ernst Lengyel, Iris L. Romero — PLoS One

From the abstract: “his is a single-institution retrospective cohort review of patients treated for epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) between 1992 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I–IV OvCa. The primary exposures analyzed were hyperlipidemia and statin use … Statin use among patients with non-serous-papillary OvCa was associated with improvement in both PFS and DSS.”

Venous thromboembolism after diaphragm pacing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Kourosh Rezania, Ori Gottlieb, Amy Guralnick, Vivek Prachand, Bobbie J. Sweitzer, Wicki Vigneswaran, Steven R. White andRaymond P. Roos — Muscle & Nerve

From the abstract: “Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are prone to venous thromboembolism (VTE) and secondary complications. Since there is an increased incidence of VTE after surgical procedures, placement of a Diaphragm Pacing System (DPS) in ALS patients as treatment for respiratory muscle weakness could potentially increase the incidence of VTE, especially in patients with limited mobility.”

National trends in the management of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the United States: including Adam B. Weiner, Sanjay G. Patel and Scott E. Eggener — Journal of Urology

From the abstract: “Factors affecting the adoption of non-curative initial management (NCIM) in the United States for low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) on a population-based level are unknown. Our objectives were to measure temporal trends in the proportion of low- and intermediate-risk PCa patients electing NCIM in the US and analyze the association of factors affecting management choice … Two, independently-managed population-based datasets confirm a temporal increase in NCIM among low-risk patients that did not translate into greater use overall among low- and intermediate-risk patients combined.”

About Matt Wood (491 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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