LabBook September 12, 2014

Pritzker School of Medicine students Brittany Seidensticker, and Claire Naus, right, take part in rounds on the fourth floor NICU at Comer Children's Hospital Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, on the University of Chicago campus. At left is resident Ernest Nwachukwu, MD.   (Photo: Robert Kozloff)

Pritzker School of Medicine students Brittany Seidensticker, and Claire Naus, right, take part in rounds on the fourth floor NICU at Comer Children’s Hospital Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, on the University of Chicago campus. At left is resident Ernest Nwachukwu, MD. (Photo: Robert Kozloff)

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Severe Respiratory Illness Associated with Enterovirus D68 — Missouri and Illinois, 2014: including Emily Obringer, Daniel Johnson, Louise Giles and Ajanta Patel — CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Excerpt: “On August 19, 2014, CDC was notified by Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, of an increase (relative to the same period in previous years) in patients examined and hospitalized with severe respiratory illness, including some admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. An increase also was noted in detections of rhinovirus/enterovirus by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay in nasopharyngeal specimens obtained during August 5–19. On August 23, CDC was notified by the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital in Illinois of an increase in patients similar to those seen in Kansas City. To further characterize these two geographically distinct observations, nasopharyngeal specimens from most of the patients with recent onset of severe symptoms from both facilities were sequenced by the CDC Picornavirus Laboratory. Enterovirus D68* (EV-D68) was identified in 19 of 22 specimens from Kansas City and in 11 of 14 specimens from Chicago. Since these initial reports, admissions for severe respiratory illness have continued at both facilities at rates higher than expected for this time of year. Investigations into suspected clusters in other jurisdictions are ongoing.”

Factors Influencing Parental Involvement Among Minors Seeking an Abortion: A Qualitative Study: including Lee Hasselbacher and Melissa Gilliam — American Journal of Public Health

From the abstract: “We explored factors that influenced whether minors involved or excluded a parent when seeking an abortion. In the summer of 2010, we conducted interviews with 30 minors who sought an abortion in a state that did not require parental involvement at the time … Minors were motivated to involve parents and other adults who were engaged in their lives at the time of the pregnancy, particularly those who supported them in obtaining an abortion. Motivations to exclude a parent were often based on particular family circumstances or experiences that suggested that involvement would not be helpful, might be harmful, or might restrict a minor’s ability to obtain an abortion.”

The Role of Statins for Primary Prevention in Non-elderly Colorectal Cancer Patients: Amikar Sehdev, Ya-Chen Shih, Dezheng Huo, Benjamin Vekhter, Christopher Lyttle and Blase Polite — Anticancer Research

From the abstract: “There is conflicting evidence for the role of statins in the primary prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a case control study (N=357,702) in the non-elderly adult US population (age=18-64 years) with the primary objective to examine the association between CRC and statin use … Statins appears to reduce the risk of CRC in non-elderly US population. Chemoprevention with statin might be more effective in non-elderly US population.”

Restoring tactile and proprioceptive sensation through a brain interface: Gregg Tabot, Sung Shin Kim, Jeremy Winberry and Sliman Bensmaia — Neurobiology of Disease

From the abstract: “Somatosensation plays a critical role in the dexterous manipulation of objects, in emotional communication, and in the embodiment of our limbs. For upper-limb neuroprostheses to be adopted by prospective users, prosthetic limbs will thus need to provide sensory information about the position of the limb in space and about objects grasped in the hand. One approach to restoring touch and proprioception consists of electrically stimulating neurons in somatosensory cortex in the hopes of eliciting meaningful sensations to support the dexterous use of the hands, promote their embodiment, and perhaps even restore the affective dimension of touch. In this review, we discuss the importance of touch and proprioception in everyday life, then describe approaches to providing artificial somatosensory feedback through intracortical microstimulation (ICMS).”

About Matt Wood (468 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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