LabBook November 7, 2014

Olaf Schneewind, MD, PhD, Louis Block Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, and Christine Babcock, MD, Assistant Professor and Director of the Emergency Medicine Residency Program, discuss the Ebola outbreak during a University of Chicago Medicine town hall forum on Oct. 16, 2014. (Photo by Ashley Heher)

Olaf Schneewind, MD, PhD, Louis Block Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, and Christine Babcock, MD, Assistant Professor and Director of the Emergency Medicine Residency Program, discuss the Ebola outbreak during a University of Chicago Medicine town hall forum on Oct. 16, 2014. (Photo by Ashley Heher)

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Disparities in Treatment of Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis: including Michael Spiotto and Ralph Weichselbaum — Journal of Thoracic Oncology

From the abstract: “Patients unable to receive surgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can undergo conventional radiotherapy (ConvRT), stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), or no treatment (NoTx). This study assessed patterns of care and disparities in the receipt of each of these treatments … There were marked institutional and socioeconomic variations in the treatment of inoperable stage I NSCLC. These results suggest that removal of barriers to receive radiation therapy and particularly improved access to SBRT may meaningfully improve survival in this disease.”

Ecological Momentary Assessment of Eating Episodes in Obese Adults: including Andrea Goldschmidt — Psychosomatic Medicine

From the abstract: “The context of eating episodes in obesity is poorly understood. This study examined emotional, physiological, and environmental correlates of pathological and nonpathological eating episodes in a heterogeneous sample of obese adults … binge eating and loss-of-control eating were more consistently associated with emotional and physiological cues than overeating only and nonpathological eating, whereas most environmental variables did not differ among eating episode types. Results support distinctions among the different constructs characterizing aberrant eating and may be used to inform interventions for obesity and related eating pathology.”

Putting Theory Into Practice: A Case Study of Diabetes-Related Behavioral Change Interventions on Chicago’s South Side: Monica Peek, Molly Ferguson, Tonya Roberson and Marshall Chin — Health Promotion Practice

From the abstract: “Diabetes self-management is central to diabetes care overall, and much of self-management entails individual behavior change, particularly around dietary patterns and physical activity. Yet individual-level behavior change remains a challenge for many persons with diabetes, particularly for racial/ethnic minorities who disproportionately face barriers to diabetes-related behavioral changes. Through the South Side Diabetes Project, officially known as “Improving Diabetes Care and Outcomes on the South Side of Chicago,” our team sought to improve health outcomes and reduce disparities among residents in the largely working-class African American communities that comprise Chicago’s South Side. In this article, we describe several aspects of the South Side Diabetes Project that are directly linked to patient behavioral change, and discuss the theoretical frameworks we used to design and implement our programs.”

Use of Heliox Delivered via High-Flow Nasal Cannula to Treat an Infant With Coronavirus-Related Respiratory Infection and Severe Acute Air-Flow Obstruction: Sherwin Morgan, Kirissa Vukin, Steve Mosakowski, Patti Solano, Lolita Stanton, Lucille Lester, Romeen Lavani, Jesse Hall and Avery Tung — Respiratory Care

From the abstract: “Heliox, a helium-oxygen gas mixture, has been used for many decades to treat obstructive pulmonary disease … In infants, coronavirus infection can cause bronchitis, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia in variable combinations and can produce enough air-flow obstruction to cause respiratory failure. We describe a case of coronavirus OC43 infection in an infant with severe acute respiratory distress treated with heliox inhalation to avoid intubation.”

About Matt Wood (506 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer at the University of Chicago Medicine and nonfiction editor for Another Chicago Magazine.
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