LabBook December 5, 2014

The gluten-free food station at the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine cafeteria. UChicago recently received gluten-free certification from a leading industry group for its cafeteria, inpatient kitchen and student dining hall, becoming the first academic institution to earn accreditation for both its medical center and undergraduate campus.

The gluten-free food station at the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine cafeteria. UChicago recently received gluten-free certification from a leading industry group for its cafeteria, inpatient kitchen and student dining hall, becoming the first academic institution to earn accreditation for both its medical center and undergraduate campus.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Eleanor Roosevelt’s Last Days: A Bioethical Case Study: including Daniel Sulmasy, MD, PhD — The American Journal of Medicine

From the abstract: “When Eleanor Roosevelt died in 1962, she was widely regarded as “the greatest woman in the world.” In spite of her celebrity, or more likely because of it, she was forced to endure a protracted period of intense suffering and humiliation before dying. On critical analysis, her end-of-life care violated most of the ethical standards of care for the dying we hold dear today.”

Old drug, new trick: Repurposing metformin for gynecologic cancers? Terri Febbraro, Ernst Lengyel and Iris Romero — Gynecologic Oncology

From the abstract: “There is increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence that metformin, a commonly used diabetes medication, has a protective effect in cancer. The aim of this review is to discuss metformin’s anti-cancer molecular mechanisms of action and to summarize the current literature demonstrating metformin’s potential in gynecologic cancer prevention and treatment.”

The emergency cardiac arrest response team (eCART): A novel strategy for improving therapeutic hypothermia utilization following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: including Willard Sharp, Gerasim Orbelyan, Meredith Borak, Janet Friant, Atman Shah and David Beiser — Resuscitation

From the abstract: “Out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with significant mortality. Therapeutic hypothermia is one of the few interventions that have been shown to increase post-arrest survival as well as enhance neurologic recovery. Despite clinical guidelines recommending the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following cardiac arrest, utilization rates by physicians remain low. We hypothesized that the development of a multi-disciplinary emergency cardiac arrest response team (eCART) would enhance therapeutic hypothermia utilization in the emergency department for OHCA.”

Save-a-life at the ballpark: 10-min spectator training achieves proficiency in cardiac arrest response: including Teri Campbell — Resuscitation

From the abstract: “To determine immediate recall, feasibility, and efficiency of a brief out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) bystander response training session at a large sporting event … A convenience sample of baseball fans participated in a 10-min training on OHCA recognition, CPR and automatic external defibrillator (AED) use and completed post-training knowledge surveys … A 10-min training session is feasible and can achieve good recall in cardiac arrest response. However, participant recruitment dominated most of our volunteer effort.”

About Matt Wood (491 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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