LabBook, January 23, 2015

Chicago White Sox manager Robin Ventura helps a patient at Comer Children's Hospital with an art project. Ventura, outfielder Avisail Garcia and pitcher Dan Jennings visited on Jan. 22, 2015.

Chicago White Sox manager Robin Ventura helps a patient at Comer Children’s Hospital with an art project. Ventura, outfielder Avisail Garcia and pitcher Dan Jennings visited on Jan. 22, 2015.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

A comparison of effectiveness of hepatitis B screening and linkage to care among foreign-born populations in clinical and nonclinical settings: including Karen Kim — Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare

From the abstract: “Hepatitis B (HBV) is an urgent, unmet public health issue that affects Asian Americans disproportionately. Of the estimated 1.2 million living with chronic hepatitis B in USA, more than 50% are of Asian ethnicity, despite the fact that Asian Americans constitute less than 6% of the total US population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends HBV screening of persons who are at high risk for the disease. Yet, large numbers of Asian Americans have not been diagnosed or tested, in large part because of perceived cultural and linguistic barriers … In this study, the Asian Health Coalition and its community partners conducted HBV screenings and follow-up linkage to care in both clinical and nonclinical settings.”

DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells: including Lucy Godley — PLOS One

From the abstract: “Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells … Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue.”

Beta-cell destruction and preservation in childhood and adult onset type 1 diabetes: including Ananta Poudel, Omid Savari, Michael Millis, Piotr Witkowski and Manami Hara — Endocrine

From the abstract: “Previous studies describing the symptomatic onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and rate of beta-cell loss (C-peptide) support the notion that childhood onset T1D exhibits more severe beta-cell depletion compared to adult onset T1D. To test this notion, we performed whole pancreas analyses in two T1D cases, one of childhood onset (7-year old, onset at 1.5-year) along with an adult onset case (43-year old with onset at 27-year) … These results support a hypothesis that during T1D development in childhood, beta-cells are more susceptible to autoimmune destruction or immune attack is more severe, while beta-cell death in the adult onset T1D may be more protracted and incomplete. In addition, T1D may be associated with the formation of “empty” beta-cells, an interesting population of cells that may represent a key facet to the disorder’s pathogenesis.”

About Matt Wood (468 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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