LabBook, January 30, 2015

This week, Vincent Lynch's work showed how pregnancy evolved in mammals from laying eggs like these platypuses to giving birth to live fully-developed young. We also wanted to get as much mileage as possible out of this photo.

This week, Vincent Lynch’s work showed how pregnancy evolved in mammals from laying eggs like these platypuses to giving birth to fully-developed young. We also wanted to get as much mileage as possible out of this photo.

This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians:

Pathologic outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer after delayed radical prostatectomy in the United States: Adam Weiner,  Sanjay Patel, Scott Eggener — Urologic Oncology

From the abstract: “To measure adverse pathologic outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) for men with low-risk prostate cancer in the United States based on time from diagnosis to surgery … In the United States, nearly half of men with low-risk prostate cancer experience at least one adverse pathologic outcome at RP. Delaying RP up to 12 months did not change the risk of adverse pathology. Men may safely use the time following their initial biopsy to consider management options and obtain a restaging biopsy, if recommended.”

Risk of second malignancies in patients with early-stage classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma treated in a modern era: including Melissa LeMieux, Abhishek Solanki, Steven Chmura and Matthew Koshy — Cancer Medicine

From the abstract: “Second malignancies remain an issue affecting morbidity and mortality in long-term survivors of early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). We undertook this study to determine if treatment in the modern era resulted in decreased second malignancies … Our analysis suggests that in patients treated with [radiation therapy] for stage I or II [classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma], treatment prior to 2000 had a slightly higher risk of second malignancy compared to treatment in 2000 and later.”

Linked canopy, climate, and faunal change in the Cenozoic of Patagonia: including Richard Madden — Science

From the abstract: “Vegetation structure is a key determinant of ecosystems and ecosystem function, but paleoecological techniques to quantify it are lacking. We present a method for reconstructing leaf area index (LAI) based on light-dependent morphology of leaf epidermal cells and phytoliths derived from them. Using this proxy, we reconstruct LAI for the Cenozoic (49 million to 11 million years ago) of middle-latitude Patagonia.”

About Matt Wood (491 Articles)
Matt Wood is a senior science writer for the University of Chicago Medicine and editor of the Science Life blog.
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