At the Bench

Research from the forefront of medicine and biological science.

The Curve That Changed the World

August 10, 2011

Let’s start with a statistic: almost 2,000 citations a year. One paper by Paul Meier, the Ralph and Mary Otis Isham Distinguished Service Professor emeritus of statistics, pharmacological and physiological sciences, medicine, and the college, [Read more]

Genes Versus The Environment Inside

July 21, 2011

The odds of acquiring a disease are often portrayed as a tug of war between two foes: genes and environment. The battle is not always evenly matched. A disease such as cystic fibrosis is entirely genetic – if a child inherits the mutated CFTR [Read more]

A Time Machine for Limb Evolution

July 11, 2011

It’s one of the most significant events in Earth’s history: the moment when a sea creature first stepped – or more likely wriggled – onto land. The momentous occasion 400 million years ago opened up a whole new habitat where [Read more]

The Tools of the Human Microbiome

July 7, 2011

The latest cult favorite in the sphere of human genetics is the microbiome, the genes of the bacterial species that live inside and upon the human body. Because bacterial cells outnumber human cells in an adult by approximately ten to one, and tens [Read more]

The Flaws That Made Us Complex

May 19, 2011

One common misconception about evolution is that it produces “better” organisms with time – a seductive opinion to humans who would like to think of themselves as the pinnacle of natural selection. In a way, it’s an easy [Read more]

The Secret World of Microbes

March 21, 2011

Since the time of Linnaeus, scientists have loved classifying the world around them. But while centuries of biologists have worked to collect and categorize the plants and animals of Earth, all that work likely only covers about a minute fraction of [Read more]