History

Where We Split From Sharks

June 13, 2012

Over 400 million years ago, fish went through an evolutionary divorce that would someday be very relevant to humans. The split produced the two major groups of fish we see in our world today: those with skeletons of bone, which make up the majority [Read more]

Medical Ethics Summer School

August 9, 2011

It has been a couple months since the end of the spring quarter, and the with it the end of many of the Medical Center’s weekly lecture series. But a recent batch of videos posted to the website of the MacLean Center for Medical Ethics brought [Read more]

A Face Only a Biologist Could Love

July 25, 2011

In evolutionary biology today, it’s the ugly guys who get famous. But that hasn’t always been the case. When paleontologists were assembling a library of prehistoric life in the 19th century, they wanted to find the fossils they could [Read more]

The Leaky Pipeline of Women in Science

June 8, 2011

By Meghan Sullivan That there even was a luncheon at Crerar library last week to welcome Nancy Hopkins was a sign of progress. Speaking of a committee formed at MIT in 1995 to explore gender discrimination among tenured faculty, she commented that [Read more]

The Wandering Cells of Migraine Aura

May 23, 2011

Many people who suffer from regular migraines experience a kind of prelude to their attack, known as a migraine aura. Less than an hour before the headache begins, the person experiences a sensory or motor disturbance, such as flickering shapes and [Read more]

Fighting Disparities During Segregation

May 13, 2011

Reducing health disparities in the United States has been a top priority for our health care system in these early years of the 21st century. But efforts to narrow the health gap between black and white patients go much farther back, to the start of [Read more]