neurobiology

A New Model for Anxiety…and More

May 15, 2012

by Rob Mitchum An advantage and disadvantage of hypothesis-free studies looking for genes associated with various traits or diseases is that they often point to genetic candidates that don’t make immediate sense. One example of this occurrence [Read more]

Hacking the Brain’s Security System

May 11, 2012

by Rob Mitchum The brain is a privileged organ, afforded protections denied to all the other organs of the body. Though the circulatory system functions much the same way above and below the neck, using blood to exchange nourishment for waste with [Read more]

Building a Better OCD Mouse

September 20, 2011

How do you know an animal model of a disease is really working? Researchers can create diseases such as cancer in a rat or mouse, but a tumor in a rodent may not behave the same way as a tumor in a human being. The challenge is even more difficult [Read more]

Rewriting the Book on the Brain

August 31, 2011

Students might sometimes think that their textbook appeared out of thin air, the accumulated knowledge of a field spontaneously forming into a heavy slab of facts and figures. But textbooks are like any other type of book, with flesh-and-blood [Read more]

The Wandering Cells of Migraine Aura

May 23, 2011

Many people who suffer from regular migraines experience a kind of prelude to their attack, known as a migraine aura. Less than an hour before the headache begins, the person experiences a sensory or motor disturbance, such as flickering shapes and [Read more]