Pediatrics

Sickle Cell on the Football Field

January 17, 2011

In 2006, Rice University football player Dale Lloyd II collapsed during a practice and later died. The cause of death was acute exertional rhabdomyolysis, a sudden breakdown of muscle tissue into the blood brought on by strenuous exercise. But the [Read more]

A New Building, A New Discipline

December 13, 2010

Today, the University of Chicago announced plans to construct the William Eckhardt Research Center, an innovative new building along Ellis Avenue that will be home to many researchers in the physical sciences. But just as newsworthy as the new [Read more]

Cancer Disparities at an Early Age

November 23, 2010

Racial disparities have been described for almost every type of cancer, with the gap in outcomes widening or holding steady between black and white patients in breast, prostate, colorectal, and lung cancers. Much debate has occurred over the causes [Read more]

Dodging the Bullet of 1918

October 26, 2010

When the novel H1N1 flu virus began to appear in North America and Europe in Spring 2009, it contained some worryingly familiar signs to flu experts. The new strain appeared suddenly in a season when flu typically declines, spread at a rapid pace, [Read more]

A Big Leap for Neuroblastoma

September 30, 2010

Cancer successes are usually measured in months, not years. Large clinical trial on promising new treatments are celebrated when they show an average effect of a dozen weeks, and extension of life that can be measured in years is cause for rapture. [Read more]

Feeding Your Internal Ecosystem

September 13, 2010

The human body is not just an organism, it’s an ecosystem. To the billions of microscopic bacteria, viruses and fungi living in the various nooks and crannies of our intestines, mouth, nose, and other areas, we are the world, the environment [Read more]

Two Words: Plastics and Toxicology

August 26, 2010

The story of bisphenol A (BPA), the organic compound used to make the stiff plastic of water bottles, CDs and other consumer products, has been well told by the media. Once thought to be harmless to humans in the amounts used for plastic production, [Read more]

To Test or Not to Test

August 5, 2010

The idealized view of genetic medicine is a world where every person’s DNA can be tested for the genes that predispose them to disease. Armed with this information, physician and patient can take early preventive steps to help decrease an [Read more]

Computerizing the Chaos of Epilepsy

July 9, 2010

The electrical symphony of the human brain, with billions of neurons firing at different rates, up to hundreds of times per second, likely looks like chaos to any outside observer. But there are patterns in the ongoing brain activity seen, for [Read more]